Rowing Ireland’s Year on Top

Rowing Ireland held its AGM over Zoom yesterday and reported on a successful year on the water in 2019.

“Rowing is fast becoming one of Ireland’s most competitive International sports,” read an extract from the Annual Report.

“There are currently four confirmed boats for the Tokyo Olympics in 2021 with
seven athletes representing Ireland.”

“Ireland is ranked second in the World in Olympic boat classes after our success at the World Rowing Championships in Linz, Austria in 2019.”

“Rowing Ireland caters for River rowing, Coastal rowing and Off shore rowing with members aged from 8 – 88 years of age.”

“Annual events include Irish Rowing Championships, Irish Coastal Rowing Championships, Irish Off shore Rowing Championships and Irish Indoor Rowing Championships.”

“The Get Going…Get Rowing programme which is a school based learn to row programme holds a series of indoor and outdoor #Blitz events series around the
country.”

“We are now one year into the four years of our strategy and we are pleased to be able to report that we are on target to deliver the ambitious goals set out in that plan.”

“Although the effects of the current uncertainty created as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic may impact our future outlook.”

“2019 was an exceptional year for Rowing in Ireland with four boats qualified for Tokyo 2021 and ranking second in the world. Our pathways are strong with a Silver and Bronze medal at the World U23 Championships and a Silver medal at the Junior European Championships. In addition, fourth and fifth place for our junior athletes at the World Rowing Championships in Tokyo, Japan.”

“We ran more community programmes in partnership with our clubs and our programmes. Income and expenditure remain strong as we strive to become a bigger and more effective sport.”

There are many areas to like about what the sport is doing at the high performance level but also at grassroots.

Too often the focus on the elite end can deflect from what needs to happen to sustain the wave of popularity that Olympic success can bring.

Rowing Ireland has produced a special campaign aimed at helping individual clubs to build the skills they will need to present themselves as a viable sporting option should the success of the O’Donovan Brothers in Rio be repeated or even built upon in Tokyo next summer.

It recognises the need to create and tell its own stories and has increased its social media engagement, started a new podcast and begun its own YouTube channel.

It secured a first national headline partner in 2019 with Kinetica Sports and also won through in the bid for Large Scale Infrastructure Funding with a grant towards the National Rowing Centre in Cork of €615,000.

The sport has a good team in place on and off the water and is well placed structurally, talent wise and financially to emerge from the pandemic.

The AGM set dates of the 12th and 13th September to host this year’s delayed Irish National Championships.

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