20×20, in partnership with KPMG, has switched on the social side of #ThinkItAskIt as part of the fifth and final chapter of the award-winning movement.

#ThinkItAskIt is a nationwide call to arms to help provoke permanent change for women’s sport in Ireland and is urging the public and all stakeholders involved in sport to ask key questions, not only of themselves but of society at large.

Now in the closing stages of the 20×20 movement, #ThinkItAskIt aims to highlight that we all have a choice to make about what happens next for women’s sport.

Launched on 20×20 and KPMG’s social media channels yesterday, the #ThinkItAskIt call to action follows the launch of 20×20’s final chapter on September 8th, ‘The Future for Women in Sport: Choose What’s Next’.

Future

#ThinkItAskIt sees 20×20 calling on people to ask questions about the future of sport for girls and women in Ireland, and to post these questions on social media using the hashtags #20×20 and #ThinkItAskIt with a view to generating conversation and inspiring a move to greater equality for women in sport.

In support of #ThinkItAskIt, 20×20 has released a podcast special that seeks to explore in more depth the views and opinions of a number of people who are at the forefront of the women in sport journey.

Mary O’Connor, Elaine Buckley, Cliona O’Leary, Ryle Nugent and Gavin Cummiskey all feature in the 24-minute piece, giving their perspective on what every stakeholder in Irish sport needs to do next in order to maintain the momentum that 20×20 has generated.

As part of #ThinkItAskIt, the 20×20 Steering Committee – made up of representatives from across Ireland’s sporting bodies, media, sponsors and athletes, and including Rob Hartnett of Sport for Business – gathered to compile the most important questions for the progression of women in sport.

Questions

Examples of these questions include whether a seven-year-old girl has the same opportunities in sport as a seven-year-old boy? If the language and imagery we use around women’s sport contains a subconscious bias? And if the level of respect for female athletes is equal to that of their male counterparts?

The questions will feature across 20×20 and KPMG’s social channels between now and the end of October in an effort to provoke Irish society to consider whether we are all doing enough to champion women’s sport in Ireland.

The 20×20 campaign will draw to a close later this year with a much-anticipated finale event proudly supported by KPMG, that will see athletes and a number of other stakeholders come together to reflect upon the changes that have happened for women’s sport in Ireland, and discuss what still needs to be done.

Here is The Long Road, the short-form documentary that charts the story so far…